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Generalized Anxiety Disorder Treatment and Therapy Center in Fort Lauderdale, South Florida

The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center, located in the heart of Florida, is a leading provider of evidence-based treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder. We offer a variety of treatment options tailored to each individual’s needs. Our center, nestled in beautiful Broward County and just a short drive from Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Hollywood, Coral Gables, Key West, and Pompano Beach, is renowned for its exceptional care and commitment to patient well-being.

We understand that coping with Generalized Anxiety Disorder can be daunting, so we’re here to help. At The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center, we believe in empowering our patients through comprehensive psychotherapy, outpatient and inpatient programs, medication options, and support groups. If you or a loved one are experiencing symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder, don’t hesitate to reach out. Our dedicated team is ready to provide the support you need. Don’t wait another day – call us today to learn more about our unique treatment programs for Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

 

What is Generalized Anxiety Disorder?

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a chronic and excessive worrying condition characterized by persistent, uncontrollable anxiety about various aspects of life, including health, work, and relationships. Individuals with GAD often experience heightened, disproportionate levels of anxiety related to everyday situations, even when there is no apparent reason for concern.

Unlike specific phobias that focus on particular fears, GAD involves a more generalized sense of apprehension and restlessness that can interfere significantly with daily functioning. Individuals may find it challenging to relax and anticipate negative outcomes in routine situations. The disorder often develops gradually and can manifest at any stage of life, although it frequently emerges in adolescence or early adulthood. With appropriate intervention, individuals with GAD can learn to manage their anxiety and improve their overall quality of life.1

What Causes Generalized Anxiety Disorder?

What Causes Generalized Anxiety Disorder?

Generalized anxiety disorder is a complex mental health condition influenced by a combination of biological, environmental, and psychological factors. A holistic understanding of the contributing elements is crucial for tailoring effective treatment approaches that address the unique needs of individuals experiencing GAD. Below, we take a closer look at certain factors that contribute to the overall picture.

  • Brain Chemistry and Alterations in Brain Structure: Research suggests that neurotransmitter imbalances may contribute to the development of GAD. Specifically, abnormalities in the functioning of serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and norepinephrine have been implicated.2

Additionally, alterations in the structure of specific brain regions, such as the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex, which play crucial roles in emotion regulation and decision-making, may be associated with GAD.3

  • Environmental Stressors: High levels of stress or exposure to prolonged stressful situations can trigger or exacerbate GAD. Stressors such as financial difficulties, work-related pressures, family problems, or traumatic events can contribute to the development of chronic anxiety. The cumulative impact of these stressors may overwhelm an individual’s coping mechanisms, leading to the onset of GAD.4
  • Personality Factors and Disorders: Certain personality traits and disorders are linked to an increased susceptibility to GAD. Individuals who exhibit traits like perfectionism, excessive worrying, or a tendency to be easily startled may be more prone to developing the condition. Moreover, individuals with other mental health disorders, such as depression or panic disorder, may have a higher risk of experiencing generalized anxiety.5
  • Medical Conditions: Certain conditions can contribute to the development or exacerbation of GAD. Chronic illnesses, especially those affecting the cardiovascular or respiratory systems, may induce persistent worry about health. Additionally, hormonal imbalances and conditions such as thyroid disorders can impact mood and contribute to anxiety symptoms.6
  • Neurological Conditions: Disorders affecting the central nervous system, such as epilepsy or multiple sclerosis, may be associated with an increased risk of GAD. The intricate relationship between neurological functioning and emotional regulation suggests that disruptions in neurological processes can contribute to the manifestation of generalized anxiety.

Different Types of Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can manifest in various ways, leading to different types characterized by distinct patterns of excessive worry and associated symptoms. The following is not a complete list but illustrates the diverse ways in which GAD may present. Understanding these variations can contribute to better comprehension of the disorder and its impact on individuals’ lives.

Generalized Worry

Generalized Worry

Generalized worry manifests with persistent, pervasive concerns about a wide array of everyday issues, including those related to health, work, relationships, and future uncertainties. These worries extend beyond specific stressors. Unlike situational concerns, generalized worry in GAD is excessive, difficult to control, and often disproportionate to the actual circumstances.

Health Anxiety (Hypochondriasis)

Health Anxiety (Hypochondriasis)

Health anxiety, also known as hypochondriasis, is a specific subtype of GAD characterized by an intense, persistent preoccupation with the fear of having a serious medical condition. Individuals with health anxiety often interpret minor bodily sensations or normal variations in health as signs of severe illness, leading to heightened distress and anxiety.7

Perfectionism-Related Anxiety

Perfectionism-Related Anxiety

Perfectionism-related anxiety, a facet of generalized anxiety disorder, involves an intense fear of mistakes and an obsessive pursuit of flawlessness. Individuals set high standards, causing chronic worry about not meeting expectations. This fear of errors permeates various life aspects, like work, relationships, and personal achievements. Therapeutic interventions targeting perfectionistic tendencies and anxiety management are crucial for addressing this subtype.8

Decision-Making Anxiety

Decision-Making Anxiety

Decision-making anxiety is characterized by heightened distress and apprehension surrounding the process of making choices. Individuals experiencing this subtype of GAD may find decision-making challenging, fearing the potential for making the wrong decisions and anticipating negative consequences. This anxiety can lead to procrastination, indecisiveness, and a reluctance to commit to decisions, impacting both personal and professional life aspects.9

Sleep-Related Anxiety

Sleep-Related Anxiety

Sleep-related anxiety involves persistent fears about the quality and duration of sleep, with concerns ranging from insomnia to nightmares. Sleep-related anxiety can create a self-perpetuating cycle, as the fear of not getting adequate rest may further disrupt sleep patterns. This type of GAD can significantly impact overall well-being, contributing to daytime fatigue and heightened stress levels.10

Work or Academic Performance Anxiety

Work or Academic Performance Anxiety

Work or academic performance anxiety is characterized by heightened anxiety about meeting performance standards, fear of criticism, and concern about making mistakes in their work or academic pursuits. This anxiety can negatively impact productivity, concentration, and overall job or academic satisfaction.

>Different Types of Generalized Anxiety Disorder

At The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Treatment Center in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, our team of dedicated professionals is ready to guide you. We offer IOP and a variety of treatments programs, each uniquely designed to meet your needs. So don’t wait, reach out to us today! Either give us a call or fill up the form below to request a callback.

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Signs and Symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Recognizing generalized anxiety disorder symptoms is crucial for seeking timely intervention and support. Individuals experiencing persistent and distressing anxiety should consult with mental health professionals for a comprehensive assessment and insight into the appropriate GAD treatment options. Call 877-958-9212 for your free assessment now. Common signs and symptoms of GAD include:11

Common Signs and Symptoms

Common Signs and Symptoms

  • Excessive Worrying: Chronic and uncontrollable worrying about a range of everyday concerns, even when there is no apparent reason for anxiety and often disproportionate to the actual circumstances
  • Restlessness and Irritability: Restlessness is a common physical manifestation of GAD. Individuals may feel on edge and tense and find it challenging to relax. This restlessness is often accompanied by irritability and a heightened sensitivity to environmental stimuli
  • Muscle Tension: Tightness in muscles which can contribute to discomfort and fatigue
  • Difficulty Concentrating: GAD can impact cognitive functioning, making it difficult for individuals to concentrate and focus on tasks, possibly leading to impaired decision-making and productivity
  • Fatigue: Even if there is no physical exertion, individuals may feel tired and lacking in energy regularly
  • Sleep Disturbances: Anxiety often interferes with sleep patterns, leading to difficulties falling asleep, staying asleep, or experiencing restful sleep, which can exacerbate feelings of fatigue and contribute to a cycle of increased anxiety
  • Irrational Fears and Apprehensions: Often unrealistic, these may contribute to a heightened sense of vulnerability
  • Physical Symptoms: Headaches, stomachaches, and other discomforts without an apparent medical cause, often a result of the body’s physiological response to chronic anxiety
  • Perfectionism: Unrealistically high standards for themselves and fearing the consequences of not meeting these standards, which can contribute to heightened anxiety about performance and achievements
  • Avoidance of Everyday Activities: In an attempt to manage anxiety, individuals with GAD may avoid certain activities or situations that trigger worry, which can lead to a restricted, less fulfilling lifestyle

Call our hotline number now if you or someone you love is exhibiting some of these signs and symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder. One of our helpful patient advocates will be standing by to answer questions and guide you in the appropriate direction for treatment. Early detection is crucial to successfully managing the symptoms associated with this condition.

>Signs and Symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder

What is a Generalized Anxiety Disorder Treatment Center?

A generalized anxiety disorder medical treatment center is a healthcare facility or program designed to provide comprehensive, targeted GAD therapy interventions. These rehabilitation centers typically offer a multidisciplinary approach involving mental health professionals who collaborate to address the various facets of GAD.

The primary goal of a GAD treatment center is to assess, diagnose, and develop personalized treatment plans to help individuals manage and alleviate GAD symptoms and promote overall mental well-being. The collaborative environment in these specialty treatment centers enables a personalized and thorough approach, creating a supportive atmosphere for individuals as they navigate their path to anxiety disorder recovery.

Types of Treatment Programs for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

There are effective treatment programs designed to address the difficulties associated with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). These programs commonly utilize a blend of therapeutic approaches, anxiety counseling services, and occasionally medication for generalized anxiety to assist in alleviating symptoms. Below, we’ll explore the types of treatment programs tailored to meet the distinct needs and situations of those dealing with GAD.

Partial Hospitalization Program for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Partial Hospitalization Program for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

A Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP) for Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is an intensive and organized treatment option designed to offer comprehensive care for individuals with GAD while allowing them to return home in the evenings. This program typically includes daily therapeutic sessions, encompassing individual and group therapy, to address the challenges associated with GAD specifically.

The structured format of a GAD-focused PHP ensures dedicated attention from mental health professionals, facilitating a thorough exploration of triggers, coping strategies for GAD, and the development of effective anxiety management techniques. GAD PHPs often integrate elements of exposure therapy, assisting individuals in gradually confronting and overcoming anxiety-inducing situations, thereby boosting confidence and enhancing social functioning.

Intensive Outpatient Program for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Intensive Outpatient Program for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

An Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) presents a structured yet flexible treatment approach for GAD, catering to individuals in need of comprehensive care without requiring constant supervision. IOPs typically consist of several hours of therapy per day, multiple days a week, enabling individuals to maintain their daily routines and responsibilities while actively participating in focused treatment.

The therapeutic components of a GAD-focused IOP may encompass individual counseling, group therapy, and skill-building sessions, all directed toward addressing the specific challenges associated with generalized anxiety. This format empowers individuals to practice and apply acquired skills in their everyday lives, facilitating a gradual, sustainable integration of effective anxiety relief strategies for managing symptoms.

Outpatient Program for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Outpatient Program for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

An outpatient program for GAD offers a flexible, accessible treatment option for those seeking care while maintaining daily routines. Unlike an inpatient treatment center, outpatient programs don’t require individuals to reside at the facility. These programs typically include individual counseling, group therapy, and psychoeducation sessions tailored to address the specific challenges associated with GAD.

In an outpatient treatment center, individuals with generalized anxiety disorder can receive therapeutic support while actively applying coping strategies to their daily lives. This format allows for a more gradual integration of treatment into real-world situations, empowering individuals to manage their symptoms effectively. Regular check-ins with anxiety and mental health professionals, combined with the flexibility of outpatient care, contribute to a comprehensive, personalized approach to addressing GAD.

Residential Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Residential Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Residential treatment is a more cost-effective treatment option than inpatient care for generalized anxiety disorder, offering an immersive and supportive environment conducive to therapeutic healing. At The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center, we provide mental health retreat accommodations, especially for those traveling from out of state.

Residential treatment takes a comprehensive approach, incorporating individual and group therapy, skill-building sessions, and often emphasizing experiential therapies or activities. A residential treatment facility enables individuals to escape their usual environments, providing a dedicated space to focus on the underlying issues contributing to their condition. This immersive setting allows individuals to collaborate closely with mental health professionals and peers to develop coping strategies, enhance self-confidence, and confront generalized anxiety in a structured, nurturing environment.

>Types of Treatment Programs for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

How to Find Generalized Anxiety Disorder Centers in Florida

Nestled in the scenic Sunshine State of Florida, The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center is renowned for its dedication to evidence-based mental health programs. We specialize in successfully treating a spectrum of mental health conditions, including generalized anxiety disorder. For those traveling from out of state, we offer comfortable accommodations to ensure a seamless transition into our accredited programs.

Call 877-958-9212 or visit our therapy clinic at the following address:

When seeking a generalized anxiety disorder treatment center, follow these steps:

Steps

  • Start with Online Research: Utilize search engines like Google or Yahoo, and input keywords like “generalized anxiety disorder treatment center Florida,” “generalized anxiety disorder therapy near me,” or “EMDR generalized anxiety disorder therapy Fort Lauderdale.”
  • Online Directories: Explore platforms like Psychology Today, GoodTherapy, or TherapyDen to find therapists and treatment centers based on location and specialization.
  • Consult Referrals: Seek recommendations from your primary care physician, healthcare providers, or friends and family familiar with generalized anxiety disorder-informed therapy.
  • Contact Your Insurance Provider: Inquire about in-network generalized anxiety disorder therapy and wellness centers through your health insurance provider.
  • Local Health Directories: Check online and print healthcare directories for listings of social anxiety disorder treatment centers and providers specialized in GAD in your area.
  • Mental Health Organizations: Contact your state’s mental health department or local branches of organizations like NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) for directories of mental health providers and services.
  • Social Media: Explore platforms like Facebook groups or local community forums for recommendations on healthcare providers, generalized anxiety support groups, and holistic treatment centers.
  • Visit University and Medical School Centers: Check with nearby universities or medical schools. Many have integrative treatment centers or therapy clinics that offer research-based treatments.
  • Check Online Reviews: Read reviews and ratings for generalized anxiety disorder behavioral health centers and therapists, considering that reviews should be approached cautiously but can provide valuable insights into others’ experiences.

>How to Find Generalized Anxiety Disorder Centers in Florida

Types of Therapy and Counseling for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Effective therapeutic interventions play a crucial role in managing and alleviating the symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Various types of therapy and counseling approaches are tailored to address the unique needs of individuals with GAD. The examples provided below are not complete but represent some of the commonly utilized therapeutic methods in generalized anxiety disorder treatment.

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Generalized anxiety disorder-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy is a widely utilized and evidence-based therapeutic approach. This goal-oriented therapy focuses on identifying and challenging negative thought patterns and behaviors that contribute to anxiety, aiming to help individuals recognize and modify irrational fears and worries, fostering a more realistic and balanced perspective.12

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety typically involves structured sessions where individuals work with a therapist to explore their thought processes, understand how these thoughts influence their emotions and behaviors, and develop effective coping strategies. By breaking down overwhelming concerns into manageable components, individuals can learn to reframe their thinking, reduce anxiety, and implement practical skills to navigate daily challenges.

Individual, Group, and Family Therapy for GAD

Individual, Group, and Family Therapy for GAD

The treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) often involves a multifaceted approach, including individual, group, and family therapy:

  • Individual Therapy: In one-on-one sessions, individuals with GAD work closely with a therapist to explore personal concerns, identify triggers, and develop tailored coping strategies. Individual therapy provides a private, focused space for addressing specific aspects of GAD unique to the individual’s experiences.
  • Group Therapy: Group therapy for GAD involves individuals with similar challenges coming together in a supportive environment facilitated by a therapist. GAD support groups allow participants to share experiences, gain insights, and practice interpersonal skills in a safe setting. Group therapy fosters a sense of community and shared understanding, reducing feelings of isolation often associated with generalized anxiety.
  • Family Therapy: GAD can impact the individual and the family dynamic. Family therapy involves working with the affected individual and their family members to enhance communication, understanding, and support.13 By involving family members, therapists can address the broader impact of GAD on relationships and collaboratively develop strategies for managing anxiety within the family unit.

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a therapeutic approach that combines elements of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) with mindfulness practices. This integrative approach is particularly beneficial in the context of generalized anxiety disorder. MBCT aims to help individuals develop a non-judgmental awareness of their thoughts and feelings while cultivating skills to manage and redirect them.

MBCT often involves guided mindfulness meditations, body scan exercises, and cognitive techniques. By incorporating mindfulness into therapy, individuals can become more attuned to the present moment, reducing the impact of excessive worrying about the future. Mindfulness for anxiety empowers individuals to observe their thoughts without becoming overwhelmed, fostering greater control over their anxiety and promoting overall emotional well-being.14

Psychodynamic Therapy for GAD

Psychodynamic Therapy for GAD

Psychodynamic therapy delves into unconscious processes and early life experiences that shape current thoughts and behaviors, aiming to uncover underlying conflicts contributing to generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). By exploring the influence of past relationships and experiences, individuals gain insight into the roots of their anxiety.

Sessions focus on identifying and understanding unconscious factors, fostering self-awareness, and developing healthier coping mechanisms. While requiring time for in-depth exploration, psychodynamic therapy serves as a valuable component in the comprehensive treatment of GAD.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is a therapeutic approach combining mindfulness strategies with behavioral techniques to help individuals effectively manage generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). In ACT, individuals learn to accept their anxious thoughts and feelings rather than trying to control or eliminate them. The focus is on cultivating mindfulness, promoting a non-judgmental awareness of the present moment.15

ACT for GAD involves clarifying personal values and committing to specific actions aligned with those values. The therapy emphasizes the importance of living a meaningful life despite the presence of anxiety. By fostering acceptance and commitment to values-based actions, individuals with GAD can develop a more adaptive relationship with their anxiety, reducing the impact it has on their overall well-being.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT)

Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a therapeutic approach initially developed for individuals with borderline personality disorder but has proven effective for various mental health conditions, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). DBT integrates cognitive-behavioral techniques with mindfulness strategies, emphasizing the balance between acceptance and change.16

DBT addresses emotional dysregulation by teaching specific skills in four key areas:17

  • Mindfulness: Staying present and non-judgmental while observing thoughts and emotions
  • Interpersonal effectiveness: Enhancing communication and relationship-building
  • Emotion regulation: Managing intense emotions
  • Distress tolerance: Provides tools for coping with crises without making impulsive decisions

Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

Interpersonal Therapy (IPT)

Interpersonal therapy (IPT) is a time-limited therapeutic approach that addresses interpersonal issues and improves overall well-being. While originally developed for treating depression, IPT has demonstrated effectiveness in managing various mental health concerns, including generalized anxiety disorder. IPT focuses on the impact of relationships and social interactions on an individual’s emotional state.18

IPT explores how interpersonal difficulties may contribute to anxiety symptoms. The therapist and individual collaboratively identify and address problematic interpersonal patterns, improving communication skills and fostering healthier relationships. By enhancing interpersonal functioning, individuals with GAD can gain stress reduction techniques for managing anxiety symptoms and an improvement in overall life satisfaction. IPT provides a structured framework for individuals to explore and navigate the interpersonal dynamics influencing their anxiety and emotional well-being.

Online Therapy for GAD

Online Therapy for GAD

Online therapy, or teletherapy, provides a convenient and accessible option for managing generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Individuals can connect with mental health professionals remotely through video sessions, phone calls, or messaging, breaking down geographical barriers and offering flexibility. Online therapy’s convenience and privacy make it a practical, appealing option, particularly for those in remote areas or with mobility constraints.

>Types of Therapy and Counseling for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Does Insurance Cover Treatment for Generalized Anxiety Disorder?

Insurance coverage for the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder may differ based on the specific provisions of the insurance plan and various other factors. However, mental health services are mandated to be covered by insurance companies under the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, on par with physical illnesses.19

The extent of coverage, including copayments, deductibles, and the range of services covered, can differ significantly. It is crucial to thoroughly review your insurance details, understand the mental health benefits, and verify the specific services covered under your plan. Being well-informed about insurance coverage is vital in accessing and affording the necessary treatment. For more information, call 877-958-9212.

Which Health Insurance Providers Cover Generalized Anxiety Disorder?

Coverage for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) treatment varies among health insurance providers. Major insurance providers, like Blue Cross Blue Shield, UnitedHealthcare, Aetna, Cigna, and Humana, offer rehab insurance coverage for GAD, but specifics depend on the individual plan. To verify your coverage for GAD, contact us or your insurance provider directly.

We can communicate with your provider on your behalf and subsequently discuss the specifics with you. We’ll address any inquiries you may have and offer details regarding co-pays, deductibles, and any pre-authorization requirements associated with mental health treatment centers and services.

>Which Health Insurance Providers Cover Generalized Anxiety Disorder?

Generalized Anxiety Disorder Testing and Free Assessment

The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center provides thorough assessments for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Our expert team employs evidence-based tools and interviews to comprehend the symptoms of GAD and their impact on daily life. Through this professional evaluation, you can gain insights into cognitive strengths and challenges related to anxiety, self-esteem, relationships, and more.

To schedule a free assessment for yourself or a loved one, call 877-958-9212. This marks the initial step toward an accurate diagnosis and personalized treatment recommendations. Committed to a meticulous approach and a focus on mental health, our mental health and dual diagnosis treatment center delivers precise, considerate care. Our assessments serve as a foundation for developing a targeted and effective treatment plan for generalized anxiety disorder.

What is the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Therapy Program Admissions Process?

The admissions process for a generalized anxiety disorder therapy program is designed to ensure that individuals with GAD or other mental health concerns receive tailored care and support throughout their participation. This comprehensive admissions process aims to create a supportive, individualized framework for individuals with GAD, fostering their journey toward mental health and well-being.

Although the specific procedures can vary among treatment centers, the following provides a general overview:

Admissions Process

  • Initial Contact: You or a loved one will initiate the process by contacting the treatment center, often through a helpline, online form, or direct contact.
  • Assessment and Evaluation: A comprehensive assessment is conducted, typically involving interviews, standardized tools, and evaluations by mental health professionals. This step aims to understand your specific challenges, history, and treatment needs.
  • Insurance Verification and Coverage: The treatment center will work with you to verify insurance coverage. This involves checking the extent of coverage, co-pays, deductibles, and any pre-authorization requirements for GAD treatment.
  • Treatment Plan Development: Based on the assessment outcomes, a personalized treatment plan is developed. This plan outlines the therapeutic interventions, goals, and strategies to address your symptoms and concerns.
  • Admissions Coordination: The admissions team coordinates the logistics of your entry into the program, including arranging accommodations, scheduling, and ensuring a smooth transition into the therapy program.
  • Orientation and Program Introduction: Upon admission, you’ll undergo an orientation to familiarize yourself with the treatment center’s policies, staff, and the structure of the GAD therapy program.
  • Active Participation in Treatment: You’ll engage in various therapeutic modalities, such as individual and group therapy, counseling, and skill-building sessions, as outlined in the treatment plan. Active participation is encouraged to maximize the benefits of the program.
  • Progress Monitoring and Adjustments: Regular progress assessments monitor your response to treatment. The treatment plan may be adjusted to address emerging needs, ensuring the ongoing relevance and effectiveness of the therapeutic interventions.

>What is the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Therapy Program Admissions Process?

How Much Does Generalized Anxiety Disorder Treatment Cost in Florida?

Treatment costs for generalized anxiety disorder in Florida will vary significantly according to many different factors, including the treatment provider. For example, the cost of individual therapy sessions with a licensed therapist or psychologist typically ranges from $100 to $200 per hour.20 This variation is influenced by the provider’s qualifications, experience, and geographical location, among other factors.

Don’t let financial concerns deter you. Treatment and recovery are achievable. Contact us for a comprehensive evaluation of potential costs for your generalized anxiety disorder treatment and to discuss personalized options for financial assistance or insurance coverage that align with your specific needs, ensuring peace of mind.

Statistics on Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Statistics on Generalized Anxiety Disorder

  • Based on data from the National Health Interview Survey, adults between the ages of 18 and 29 experienced the highest percentage of mild, moderate, or severe anxiety symptoms, with the occurrence decreasing as age increased.21
  • Non-Hispanic Asian adults had the lowest rates of anxiety symptoms compared to Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black adults.
  • GAD in adolescents affects about 3% of this demographic.22
  • From February 1 to 13, 2023, 32.3% of Florida adults reported symptoms of anxiety and/or depressive disorder, the same percentage of adults in the U.S.23
  • Generalized anxiety disorder impacts 6.8 million adults, accounting for 3.1% of the U.S. population. However, only 43.2% of those affected are currently undergoing treatment.24
  • Women are twice as likely as men to be affected with generalized anxiety disorder.25
  • It’s not uncommon for generalized anxiety disorder to co-occur with major depression.26
  • Several clinical trials and empirical evidence indicate that Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) consistently leads to a notable decrease in the distressing symptoms linked to generalized anxiety disorder, including excessive worry, restlessness, muscle tension, and avoidance behaviors.27
  • If left untreated, generalized anxiety disorder raises the chances of developing secondary conditions, such as major depressive disorder (MDD)28 and other anxiety disorders. It also escalates the risk of suicide attempts and completed suicides throughout an individual’s lifespan.29 30
  • In adults with GAD, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) and Selective Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors (SNRIs) represent the first-line psychopharmacologic treatment.31


Sources

Sources

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  2. Gkintoni, Evgenia, and Paula Ortíz. “Neuropsychology of Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Clinical Setting: A Systematic Evaluation.” Healthcare, vol. 11, no. 17, Aug. 2023, p. 2446. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11172446.
  3. Šimić, Goran, et al. “Understanding Emotions: Origins and Roles of the Amygdala.” Biomolecules, vol. 11, no. 6, May 2021, p. 823. https://doi.org/10.3390/biom11060823.
  4. McLaughlin, Katie A., and Mark L. Hatzenbuehler. “Stressful Life Events, Anxiety Sensitivity, and Internalizing Symptoms in Adolescents.” Journal of Abnormal Psychology, vol. 118, no. 3, Aug. 2009, pp. 659–69. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0016499.
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  6. Aquin, Joshua P., et al. “Anxiety Disorders and General Medical Conditions: Current Research and Future Directions.” Focus, vol. 15, no. 2, Apr. 2017, pp. 173–81. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.focus.20160044.
  7. “Illness Anxiety Disorder (Hypochondria, Hypochondriasis).” Cleveland Clinic, my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/9886-illness-anxiety-disorder-hypochondria-hypochondriasis. Accessed 19 Nov. 2023.
  8. Wang, Yuzheng, et al. “The Relationship Between Perfectionism and Social Anxiety: A Moderated Mediation Model.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 19, no. 19, Oct. 2022, p. 12934. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912934.
  9. Hartley, Catherine A., and Elizabeth A. Phelps. “Anxiety and Decision-Making.” Biological Psychiatry, vol. 72, no. 2, July 2012, pp. 113–18. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2011.12.027.
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  13. Goger, Pauline, and V. Robin Weersing. “Family Based Treatment of Anxiety Disorders: A Review of the Literature (2010–2019).” Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, vol. 48, no. 1, Aug. 2021, pp. 107–28. https://doi.org/10.1111/jmft.12548.
  14. “Home – MBCT.com.” MBCT.com, 13 July 2021, www.mbct.com.
  15. Hasheminasab, Mohsen et al. “Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) For Generalized Anxiety Disorder.” Iranian journal of public health vol. 44,5 (2015): 718-9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4537636/ Accessed 19 Nov. 2023.
  16. Wilks, Chelsey R., and Erin F. Ward‐Ciesielski. “Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Training for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Considering the Value of Adapting Something New Versus Improving What Works.” Clinical Psychology-science and Practice, vol. 27, no. 4, Dec. 2020, https://doi.org/10.1111/cpsp.12346.
  17. Faßbinder, Eva, et al. “Emotion Regulation in Schema Therapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy.” Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 7, Sept. 2016, https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01373.
  18. Strong, Rebecca, and Rebecca Strong. “If Everyday Challenges Derail Your Mood and Relationships, IPT Can Teach You New Tools to Cope.” Insider, 26 Aug. 2022, www.insider.com/guides/health/mental-health/interpersonal-therapy.
  19. “The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA).” Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, www.cms.gov/marketplace/private-health-insurance/mental-health-parity-addiction-equity#Introduction. Accessed 7 Nov. 2023.
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  22. Gale, Christopher K, and Jane Millichamp. “Generalised anxiety disorder in children and adolescents.” BMJ clinical evidence vol. 2016 1002. 13 Jan. 2016. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4711893/
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  24. Yum, Lori Deuchar. “Facts and Statistics About Anxiety Disorders.” CHC Resource Library | CHC | Services for Mental Health and Learning Differences for Young Children, Teens and Young Adults | Palo Alto, San Jose, Ravenswood, 26 July 2023, www.chconline.org/resourcelibrary/facts-and-statistics-about-anxiety-disorders.
  25. “Facts and Statistics.” Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA, adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/facts-statistics. Accessed 19 Nov. 2023.
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  31. Strawn, Jeffrey R., et al. “Pharmacotherapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Adult and Pediatric Patients: An Evidence-based Treatment Review.” Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy, vol. 19, no. 10, July 2018, pp. 1057–70. https://doi.org/10.1080/14656566.2018.1491966.

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