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Depression Treatment Program in Fort Lauderdale, South Florida

The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center, located in the heart of Florida, is a leading provider of evidence-based depression treatment. We specialize in major depressive disorder and other mood disorders, offering a variety of treatment options tailored to each individual’s needs. Our center, nestled in beautiful Broward County and just a short drive from Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Hollywood, Coral Gables, Key West, and Pompano Beach, is renowned for its exceptional care and commitment to patient well-being.

We understand that coping with depression can be a daunting task, which is why we’re here to help. At The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center, we believe in empowering our patients through comprehensive depression therapy, medication options, and support groups. If you or a loved one are experiencing depressive symptoms, don’t hesitate to reach out. We’re here to help guide you on your journey towards recovery. Whether you’re dealing with depression and anxiety, or seeking more information about symptoms of depression, our dedicated team is ready to provide the support you need. If you are searching for “depression treatment near me”, don’t wait another day – call us today to learn more about our unique depression treatment programs.

What is Depression?

Depression is a severe and widespread medical illness that has a negative impact on your thoughts, feelings, and actions. However, it is a treatable condition. Depression can cause you to feel sad and lose interest in things you once enjoyed, leading to various emotional and physical problems and reducing your ability to function at work or home.

Depression can affect anyone, even those who appear to be in ideal circumstances. However, to be diagnosed with depression, the symptoms must last for at least two weeks and represent a noticeable change in your previous level of functioning. Furthermore, being sad is not the same as having depression. For example, grief is a natural and unique process that individuals go through and shares many features with depression. Recognizing the difference between grief and depression can help you get the help, support, or treatment you or a loved one needs.¹

>What is Depression?

Different Types of Clinical Depression

There are different types of depressive disorders. While depression is commonly used to describe feelings of sadness or low mood, clinical depression is not a one-size-fits-all condition. It presents itself in various forms, each with its own unique characteristics and symptoms. Below, we’ll explore a few of the key types of clinical depression.

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD)

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a prevalent form of clinical depression characterized by low mood, loss of interest in activities, and physical and cognitive symptoms, including changes in appetite and sleep patterns, fatigue, feelings of worthlessness, difficulty concentrating, and recurrent thoughts of death or suicide. The causes of depression are multifaceted, but treatment options like psychotherapy and medication are available.²

Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia)

Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia)

Persistent depressive disorder, often known as dysthymia, is a chronic form of depression characterized by a low-grade, lingering sadness lasting at least two years. Individuals with dysthymia may experience mood fluctuations but generally endure a sense of hopelessness, low self-esteem, and reduced productivity. Because it can lead to long-lasting impairment, persistent depressive disorder treatment may require a more comprehensive approach.³

Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar Depression)

Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar Depression)

Bipolar disorder, which includes periods of intense highs (mania or hypomania) and profound lows (depression), is a distinct mood disorder. Bipolar depression is the depressive phase of this condition, marked by the same symptoms as MDD. Yet, it alternates with manic or hypomanic episodes, making its diagnosis and management complex, although treatable with a combination of psychotherapy and medications.⁴

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a depression subtype that recurs seasonally, typically during the fall and winter months when daylight decreases. Symptoms include low energy, oversleeping, weight gain, and overall melancholy, which tend to alleviate in spring and summer. Light therapy, psychotherapy, and lifestyle adjustments are common strategies to alleviate this condition and help individuals cope with seasonal mood changes.⁵

Psychotic Depression

Psychotic Depression

Psychotic depression is a severe, less common subtype of major depressive disorder, marked by hallucinations or delusions. Individuals with this condition experience a distorted perception of reality alongside the typical symptoms of depression. Treatment typically involves a combination of antidepressants and antipsychotic medications, along with psychotherapy, to address both the depressive and psychotic symptoms.⁶

Postpartum Depression

Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression is a clinical depression that occurs following childbirth. It affects new mothers and may involve symptoms like overwhelming sadness, anxiety, fatigue, and difficulty bonding with the newborn. It can be emotionally challenging, but early recognition and postpartum depression treatments, including therapy, support groups, and sometimes medication, can help mothers navigate this often temporary but distressing condition.⁷

What are The Signs and Symptoms of Depression?

What are The Signs and Symptoms of Depression?

Depression is a complex, prevalent mental health condition affecting people of all ages, backgrounds, and walks of life. It’s crucial to recognize the signs and symptoms of depression, as this condition often goes beyond feeling down or experiencing occasional sadness. Depression is characterized by various emotional, cognitive, and physical manifestations, making it a multifaceted challenge.

While the severity and combination of symptoms can vary from person to person, there are common indicators to be aware of. These signs can be subtle and insidious, gradually taking hold of an individual’s life and affecting their relationships, work, and overall well-being. Understanding these signs is paramount, not only for individuals grappling with depression but also for their friends and family, as early recognition and intervention play a pivotal role in effective treatment for depression.

What to Watch For

Sings of Depression To Look Out For

Below are several common indicators to look out for, emphasizing the importance of seeking professional help when needed:

  • Persistent Low Mood: One of the hallmark signs of depression is a prolonged and pervasive feeling of sadness, hopelessness, or emptiness. This mood may persist for most of the day, nearly every day, for at least two weeks.
  • Loss of Interest and Pleasure: Individuals with depression often lose interest in previously enjoyed activities. Hobbies, social interactions, and personal relationships may become less appealing or even burdensome.
  • Changes in Sleep Patterns: Sleep disturbances are prevalent in depression. This can manifest as either insomnia, with difficulty falling or staying asleep, or hypersomnia, where individuals oversleep and struggle to wake up.
  • Appetite and Weight Changes: Depression can lead to fluctuations in appetite and weight. Some people may overeat and gain weight, while others lose their appetite and experience weight loss.
  • Fatigue and Decreased Energy: A pervasive sense of fatigue and a notable decrease in energy levels are common in depression. Simple tasks may become overwhelmingly exhausting.
  • Feelings of Worthlessness and Guilt: People with depression often experience intense and unwarranted feelings of self-doubt, worthlessness, or guilt. These negative thoughts can be all-consuming.
  • Difficulty Concentrating: Depression can impair cognitive functions, making it difficult to focus, make decisions, or remember things. This can affect work or academic performance.
  • Physical Symptoms: Some individuals with depression experience symptoms like headaches or digestive problems without apparent medical cause.
  • Psychomotor Agitation or Cognitive Impairment: People with depression may exhibit either restlessness and heightened activity levels or a significant slowing down of physical and mental processes.
  • Thoughts of Death or Suicide: In severe cases, individuals may have recurring thoughts of death or suicide and may express a desire to die or self-harm. These are serious warning signs that require emergency attention.

Remember that not everyone with depression will exhibit all these symptoms, and their severity can vary. In addition, men and women may express depression differently, both in symptoms and coping behaviors.⁸ Depression is treatable, and timely intervention can lead to effective management and improved quality of life. If you or someone you know is experiencing several of these signs and symptoms for an extended period, seeking professional help is essential.

Call our hotline for more information on depression and available resources for mental health support.

>What are The Signs and Symptoms of Depression?

What is a Depression Treatment Center?

A depression treatment center is a specialized healthcare facility designed to provide comprehensive care and support to those struggling with depression. These rehabilitation centers are staffed with mental health professionals experienced in diagnosing and treating the condition. The treatment approach at these recovery centers often involves a combination of evidence-based depression therapy, medication management, and holistic wellness practices.

Patients at depression treatment centers receive personalized treatment plans tailored to their unique needs, circumstances, and preferences. These plans may include individual therapy, depression support groups, medication, lifestyle adjustments, and strategies for managing depression and its symptoms. The goal is to provide a supportive, therapeutic environment where individuals can work towards recovery, learn coping skills, and regain control over their lives.

Types of Treatment Programs for Depression

Navigating the complexities of depression often requires a comprehensive approach. A range of depression treatment options exist to address the diverse needs of individuals with this condition. These programs aim to provide complete care to promote recovery and improved well-being, from therapy and medication management to holistic and alternative therapies. Below, we’ll explore the various types of treatment for depression.

Partial Hospitalization Program for Depression

Partial Hospitalization Program for Depression

Partial Hospitalization Programs (PHPs) offer an intermediate level of care between inpatient and outpatient treatment. These structured, intensive programs provide depression counseling and support daily without requiring an overnight stay. PHPs are suitable for individuals who don’t require 24/7 supervision but still need comprehensive treatment.

While not residing in the facility, you’ll benefit from a structured treatment schedule, which can be vital for those with severe depression or significant functional impairment. PHPs typically involve a combination of individual and group therapy, depression medications, and skill-building sessions that aim to help you develop coping strategies, manage symptoms, and work toward long-term recovery.

Intensive Outpatient Program for Depression

Intensive Outpatient Program for Depression

Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs) offer a middle ground between inpatient and outpatient care, providing more intensive treatment while allowing you to live at home. These programs typically include multiple weekly sessions, such as one-on-one therapy, group therapy, and medication management, making them suitable for individuals with moderate to severe depression who require substantial support without 24/7 supervision.

IOPs provide structure and support to assist you in overcoming depression. They focus on developing coping skills, digging into the root causes of your depression, and providing ongoing support to aid in long-term recovery. They’re especially helpful if you want intensive care but need to continue with your everyday life and responsibilities.

Outpatient Program for Depression

Outpatient Program for Depression

Outpatient programs for depression offer flexibility, with weekly therapy sessions like one-on-one or group counseling. They’re ideal for those with mild to moderate depression who don’t require round-the-clock care at a medical facility. You can maintain your daily responsibilities while getting professional support.

The main focus of an outpatient program is to give you the tools for managing depression. They help you develop coping skills and dive into what’s causing your depression. It’s a more low-key option for those who don’t need the full-time attention of an inpatient treatment center or the intensity of more comprehensive outpatient programs.

Residential Treatment for Depression

Residential Treatment for Depression

A residential treatment facility requires a stay at a medical treatment center to receive thorough care for depression. It’s mainly for those with severe or tough-to-treat depression, where regular outpatient treatment might not be enough. You’ll follow a structured daily routine during your stay, including one-on-one and group therapy, medication management, and holistic treatments.

You’ll fully immerse in an environment dedicated to your mental health and well-being. At residential mental health treatment centers, you’ll have access to different types of therapy and a team of professionals who will assist you in digging into the root causes of your depression and developing skills to cope with it. Residential treatment is a good choice if you need round-the-clock, intense support.

While we do not offer inpatient treatment at The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center in South Florida, we do assist with accommodation for those traveling in from out of state. Call 877-958-9212 to speak with one of our helpful patient advocates today and schedule your free assessment.

Types of Therapy and Counseling for Depressive Disorder

Numerous depression treatment options exist to address diverse needs, offering support and symptom relief for those managing depression. Selecting the appropriate therapy or counseling should be based on individual preferences and the specific characteristics of the depressive disorder. The following examples provide a snapshot of the available therapeutic options but don’t encompass all possibilities.

TMS Therapy for Depression

TMS Therapy for Depression

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive way to treat depression, primarily when other treatments haven’t worked. With TMS, a medical professional places a special magnet against your scalp and uses it to send quick magnetic pulses to specific parts of your brain that control mood.

The treatment involves daily sessions for a few weeks; it’s well-tolerated and doesn’t need anesthesia. This makes it a great choice if you prefer not to use depression medications or undergo invasive procedures. Studies have shown that TMS can be beneficial in reducing symptoms of depression, especially for those who haven’t had success with other treatments.⁹

EMDR Therapy for Depression

EMDR Therapy for Depression

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is a unique approach that’s gained popularity. You’ll work with a therapist to process distressing memories or negative thought patterns by following hand movements or other forms of bilateral stimulation. This helps rewire your brain, reducing the emotional charge these memories or thoughts carry.

While EMDR is most known for treating conditions like Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), it can also be beneficial for depression, particularly when your condition is linked to past experiences or painful memories. The therapy involves multiple sessions where you’ll focus on specific targets or issues. EMDR can help you reframe your perspective on these issues, diminish their emotional impact, and lead to a more positive outlook.¹⁰

Family or Couples Therapy for Depression

Family or Couples Therapy for Depression

Family or couples therapy is essential in managing depression, especially since the condition often affects relationships. You, your loved ones, and a trained therapist collaborate to explore how depression impacts your family dynamics or relationship. Together, you work on understanding depression and supporting each other better, making therapy sessions crucial in coping with depression’s significant impact on your personal life.

These therapy sessions provide a safe space to discuss feelings, challenges, and ways to improve interactions. Involving family members or a partner can help strengthen your support system and enhance your ability to cope with depression. The goal is to foster healthier relationships and ensure that those close to you can play a constructive role in your journey toward improved mental well-being.

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for Depression

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for Depression

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a powerful approach to managing depression, especially when intense emotions and self-destructive behaviors occur. In DBT, you work with a skilled therapist to learn strategies that help you regulate your emotions and build healthier coping mechanisms. It’s all about balancing and accepting your emotions while making positive changes.

This therapy usually involves both individual and group sessions, where you can practice these skills in a supportive environment. DBT equips you with practical tools for coping with depression’s challenging aspects, from emotional volatility to self-sabotaging behaviors. It’s a promising method for enhancing emotional regulation and improving your overall well-being.¹¹

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Depression

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Depression

Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a widely used and effective approach for addressing depression. In CBT, you collaborate with a trained therapist to identify and reframe negative thought patterns and behaviors contributing to your depression. The focus is on recognizing and changing distorted thinking, which can improve mood and functioning.

CBT usually involves structured sessions where you’ll work on specific challenges and develop practical strategies to overcome them. It’s a goal-oriented therapy that equips you with the skills to manage your depressive symptoms better, making it a valuable tool for those seeking a more optimistic outlook and improved mental well-being.¹²

Group Therapy for Depression

Group Therapy for Depression

Group therapy for depression creates a supportive space to connect with peers facing similar challenges. Led by a therapist, you’ll meet in small groups to share experiences, offer mutual support, and explore coping strategies. It effectively combats the isolation and loneliness often linked to depression while gaining valuable insight and practical advice from those who understand your journey.

These group sessions are structured to encourage open discussions and personal growth. They help you build a sense of community and provide different perspectives on managing depression. Group therapy can be a valuable addition to individual depression therapy or a standalone approach, offering a network of understanding and encouragement as you work toward improved mental health.

Music and Art Therapy for Depression

Music and Art Therapy for Depression

Music and art therapy offer creative ways to manage well-being. Guided by a trained therapist, you’ll engage in artistic activities, providing an outlet for processing and communicating complex emotions. This holistic approach taps into your creativity as a powerful tool for healing, making it a valuable addition to traditional therapies or a standalone method for personal growth and emotional relief.

Music and art therapy can be particularly beneficial when words fall short or traditional talk therapy isn’t your preferred choice. These sessions foster self-awareness, reduce stress, and enhance overall mental health.

>Types of Therapy and Counseling for Depressive Disorder

Does Insurance Cover Treatment for Depression

Insurance coverage for depression treatment can vary widely depending on your specific insurance plan, provider, the type of treatment, and other factors. Many health insurance plans offer coverage for mental health services as a result of mental health parity laws, which require insurance companies to provide mental health benefits comparable to coverage for physical health conditions.¹³

The extent of coverage and the specific treatments covered can vary. Some insurance plans may cover outpatient therapy, while others may include coverage for more intensive treatments like inpatient or residential care. Verify your rehab insurance policy directly with your provider or call 877-958-9212 to understand the details of your coverage, including copayments, deductibles, and any limitations on the number of therapy sessions or hospitalization days.

Which Health Insurance Providers Cover Depressive Disorder?

Many health insurance providers offer coverage for major depressive disorder treatments, including well-known companies like Blue Cross Blue Shield, Aetna, Cigna, UnitedHealthcare, and others. However, the extent of coverage can vary widely depending on several factors, including your specific policy and location.

To determine which insurance providers cover depression treatment for your specific needs, call 877-958-9212 to speak with one of our patient advocates. We’ll be happy to answer any further questions regarding rehab insurance, the types of treatment programs available to you, and more.

>Which Health Insurance Providers Cover Depressive Disorder?

How to Find a Depression Treatment Center Near Me

The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center, accredited and nestled in the beautiful Sunshine State of Florida, is renowned for its commitment to providing evidence-based mental health programs. We also offer comfortable accommodations to help you transition smoothly into our treatment programs if you travel from out of state.

  • The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center, 7710 NW 71ST CT, Tamarac, Florida, 33321
>How to Find a Depression Treatment Center Near Me

To find additional depression treatment programs in Florida, particularly in cities like Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Hialeah, Pembroke Pines, Hollywood, and Miramar, that offer services such as therapy for depression, depressive disorder treatments, psychiatric care, and community mental health services, follow these steps:

Finding Depression Treatment Programs in Florida

Finding Depression Treatment Programs in Florida

  • Online Search Engines: Use popular search engines like Google, Bing, or Yahoo. Enter keywords such as “depression therapy in Miami, Florida,” “TMS treatment for depression Fort Lauderdale,” or “psychiatric care in Florida near me.”
  • Local Directories: To find specialty treatment centers for depression in your preferred Florida city, browse online local directories like Yelp, Yellow Pages, or the Better Business Bureau.
  • Healthcare Provider Websites: Check healthcare providers’ websites, including hospitals, behavioral health centers, and community therapy clinics, for mental health services in Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Hialeah, Pembroke Pines, Hollywood, and Miramar.
  • Insurance Provider’s Directory: If you have health insurance, check your provider’s website for a directory of in-network depressive disorder treatment providers, including those in-network with your particular plan.
  • State and Local Government Resources: Check Florida state and local government websites for resources and directories for depression counseling in your area.
  • Mental Health Organizations: Check out mental health organizations’ websites in Florida for info on services and rehabilitation centers.
  • Ask for Referrals: Consult with your primary care physician, therapist, or mental health professional for reputable depression treatment center in Florida.
  • Support Groups: Consider attending local support group meetings for mental or behavioral health needs. Members often share insights and resources.
  • Read Reviews and Ratings: Check online reviews and ratings of mental health programs in Miami, Fort Lauderdale, West Palm Beach, Hialeah, Pembroke Pines, Hollywood, and Miramar to evaluate the quality of care.

What is The Depression Treatment Program Admissions Process?

When participating in a treatment program for clinical depression, the specific admission process may vary from treatment center to treatment center. You can call 877-958-9212 for a more accurate description of the depression treatment programs at The Sylvia Brafman Mental Health Center. However, below, we’ve provided a general overview of what you can expect:

Admissions Process

  • Initial Contact: This phase initiates your engagement with the program, involving an admissions coordinator gathering essential information about your situation and needs.
  • Assessment and Evaluation: A comprehensive evaluation conducted by a mental health professional delves into the nature and severity of your depression and any co-occurring disorders, shaping your treatment approach.
  • Insurance Verification and Coverage: The healthcare facility verifies your insurance to determine coverage, including copayments, deductibles, and the extent of insurance support.
  • Treatment Plan Development: A customized treatment plan is crafted based on the evaluation and insurance details, outlining specific therapies and goals tailored to your needs.
  • Admissions Coordination: The admissions coordinator assists in arranging the logistics of your admission, such as scheduling intake appointments and addressing paperwork requirements.
  • Orientation and Program Introduction: Upon admission, an orientation familiarizes you with program rules, daily schedules, and treatment modalities.
  • Active Participation in Treatment: You actively engage in your treatment plan, involving individual and group therapy, medication management, and other therapeutic activities targeting your depression.
  • Progress Monitoring and Adjustments: Continuous progress monitoring ensures that your treatment aligns with your evolving needs and goals. Regular assessments and feedback sessions help track your improvement and adapt your care as necessary.

How Much Does Depression Treatment Cost in Florida?

The cost of depression treatment in Florida can vary widely depending on several factors, including the type of treatment, the facility, your insurance coverage, and the program duration. Outpatient therapy sessions with a licensed therapist typically range from $100 to $200 per session,¹⁴ while more specialized treatments like Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) can cost between $200 and $300 per session.¹⁵

For a more accurate estimate of the costs associated with depression treatment in Florida for your specific needs, call 877-958-9212.

Statistics on Depression in Florida State

Statistics on Depression in Florida State

  • Approximately 14.7% of adults in Florida have disclosed receiving a diagnosis of a depressive disorder, including conditions like major depressive disorder (MDD), minor depression, or dysthymia, from a healthcare professional.¹⁶
  • Depression in children affects about 3.4% of those aged 3-17 in Florida (2-year estimate).¹⁷
  • 15.7% of women with a recent live birth reported experiencing symptoms of depression.¹⁸
  • Depression in adults affects 12.5% of those 65 and older who reported being told by a health professional that they have a depressive disorder, including major depressive disorder (MDD), minor depression, or dysthymia.¹⁹
  • Florida ranks among the top five states with the lowest rates of depression.²⁰
  • 18% of Medicare beneficiaries in Florida received treatment for depression.²¹
  • Depression in adolescents affects Florida’s youth, with about 13.25% reporting having experienced at least one major depressive episode in the past year.²²
  • Between February 1 and 13, 2023, 32.3% of adults in Florida indicated experiencing symptoms of an anxiety and/or depressive disorder, mirroring the same prevalence rate as adults in the United States.²³
  • 2% of Floridian youth aged 12-17 with depression received no treatment in the past year.²⁴

Sources

Sources

  1. “What Is Depression?” American Psychiatric Association, www.psychiatry.org/patients-families/depression/what-is-depression. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  2. Bains, Navneet. “Major Depressive Disorder.” StatPearls – NCBI Bookshelf, 10 Apr. 2023, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK559078.
  3. Cleveland Clinic Medical. “Persistent Depressive Disorder (PDD).” Cleveland Clinic, my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/9292-persistent-depressive-disorder-pdd. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  4. “Bipolar Disorder.” National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/bipolar-disorder. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  5. “Seasonal Affective Disorder.” Johns Hopkins Medicine, www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/seasonal-affective-disorder#:~:text=Seasonal%20affective%20disorder%2C%20or%20SAD,antidepressants%20can%20help%20treat%20SAD. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  6. “Major Depression With Psychotic Features.” Mount Sinai Health System, www.mountsinai.org/health-library/diseases-conditions/major-depression-with-psychotic-features. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  7. “Postpartum Depression – Symptoms and Causes – Mayo Clinic.” Mayo Clinic, 24 Nov. 2022, www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/postpartum-depression/symptoms-causes/syc-20376617.
  8. “Depression.” National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  9. “Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.” Mayo Clinic, 7 Apr. 2023, www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/transcranial-magnetic-stimulation/about/pac-20384625.
  10. Choosing Therapy, and Rachael Miller, LCPC, NCC, EAC. “EMDR for Depression: How It Works, Examples, & Effectiveness.” Choosing Therapy, Oct. 2023, www.choosingtherapy.com/emdr-for-depression.
  11. Choosing Therapy, and Shirley Porter RP, RSW, CCC. “DBT for Depression: How It Works, Examples, & Effectiveness.” Choosing Therapy, Aug. 2023, www.choosingtherapy.com/dbt-for-depression.
  12. Gautam, Manaswi, et al. “Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression.” Indian Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 62, no. 8, Medknow, Jan. 2020, p. 223. https://doi.org/10.4103/psychiatry.indianjpsychiatry_772_19.
  13. “The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA).” Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, www.cms.gov/marketplace/private-health-insurance/mental-health-parity-addiction-equity. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  14. Lauretta, Ashley. “How Much Does Therapy Cost in 2023?” Forbes Health, 4 May 2023, www.forbes.com/health/mind/how-much-does-therapy-cost.
  15. Choosing Therapy, and Eric Patterson LPC. “Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS): How It Works, Cost, & What to Expect.” Choosing Therapy, Sept. 2023, www.choosingtherapy.com/tms.
  16. “Explore Depression in Florida | AHR.” America’s Health Rankings, www.americashealthrankings.org/explore/measures/Depression_a/FL. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  17. “Explore Depression – Children in Florida | AHR.” America’s Health Rankings, www.americashealthrankings.org/explore/measures/depression_children/FL. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  18. “Explore Postpartum Depression in Florida | AHR.” America’s Health Rankings, www.americashealthrankings.org/explore/measures/postpartum_depression/FL. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  19. “Explore Depression – Ages 65+ in Florida | AHR.” America’s Health Rankings, www.americashealthrankings.org/explore/measures/depression_sr/FL. Accessed 12 Oct. 2023.
  20. Stacker, et al. “Florida Among States With Lowest Depression Rates.” News Channel 8 on Your Side, 1 July 2022, www.wfla.com/news/florida/florida-among-states-with-lowest-depression-rates.
  21. All4HealthFL. “All4HealthFL :: Indicators :: Depression: Medicare Population :: State : Florida.” Copyright (C) 2023 by All4HealthFL, www.all4healthfl.org/indicators/index/view?indicatorId=2058&localeId=12&comparisonId=923.
  22. “Youth Data 2022.” Mental Health America, www.mhanational.org/issues/2022/mental-health-america-youth-data#one.
  23. “Mental Health in Florida.” KFF, 20 Mar. 2023, www.kff.org/statedata/mental-health-and-substance-use-state-fact-sheets/florida.
  24. “Mental Health in Florida.” National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Feb. 2021, www.nami.org/NAMI/media/NAMI-Media/StateFactSheets/FloridaStateFactSheet.pdf.

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